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eid-ul-fitr

Eid ul Fitr or the 'festival of fast breaking' is most celebratory of all Muslim festivals. The term 'Eid' has been derived from the Arabic word ‘oud’, which means ‘the return’ and signifies the return of the festival each year. The festival is significant as much for its timing, as for its religious implications. It is celebrated after the fasting month of Ramzan (the ninth month of the Muslim year), on the first day of the Shavval month of the Hijri year (Muslim year). Legend says that the Koran was revealed to Prophet Mohammed in the last ten days of Ramadan.

The month of Ramadan is historically associated with two important victories of Prophet Muhammad - the battle of Badr and the conquest of Makkah. Fasting on Eid, according to Islamic beliefs, helps in developing self-control and is a way of getting closer to Allah. The festival marks the beginning of celebrations and merriment for a period extending to three days. Women prepare sweets at home and all Muslims are seen adorned with new dresses on this day. Eid ul Fitr is synonymous with joy and thanksgiving. Such is the spirit of this great festival that even of lot of Hindus participate in Eid celebrations in India.